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the scandal seems to be far from over. scotland yard say they have identified 4000 possible hacking victims. an inquiry will start into possible wrongdoing by police officers. we have the latest on that part of the case. >> this famous newspaper titles may have been confined to history, but the scrutiny of its methods goes on. britain's most senior policeman has officers investigating whether other officers were bribed by journalists. >> a small group of officers may have engaged in these practices. i will determine to do what we should do, and that is proceed to criminal courts. >> a former employee told the court last year as a witness that he knew nothing about payments from the police or to the police. e-mails have been provided the raise serious questions. >> someone from news international is misleading us. he has to answer a perjury charge, and that is very serious. >> tonight, it is reported that he will be arrested after setting himself to a police station for questioning. scotland yard says its investigation will be robust, whereas in the past, insiders say it has fallen short. on
of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the hearings comes after ten arrests and a series of resignatns as fallout from the phone hacking scandal grows. with me john burns, ian katz, deputy he had tortd of the guardian and david karr of the new york city times and sh tyrangiel edito of newsweek. ian katz, what does this day whh rupert murdochcalled the humblest day of his life. what does it change and where do we go from here? >> well, it's not a day we learn an awful lot of significant things. if anything the clearest lesson is wendy dang has a formidable right hook but it was a day of quite striking theatre i think. for in who sits in this country the idea of rupert murdoch who two weeks ago was the most powerful person.country being hauled into parliament to answer questions is prett pretty extraordinary and we had the dialog of him saying it was the humblest day of his lif that w pretty striking. the interesting thing is he and james murdoch came in saying sorry and contrition if you lied but the message was we're sorry but it wasn't else, was someone else's fault and that's the bi
families were victimized, too. scotland yard now says up to 4,000 people may have been targeted, in all. investigators are also looking into allegations that "news of the world" paid members of london's metropolitan police for information. the scandal prompted ford motor and a host of other companies to pull their ads from "news of the world." there are political implications too. in an emergency debate yesterday, members of parliament of both parties excoriated murdoch and his newspaper. but prime minister david cameron stopped short of calling for a separate official inquiry. >> what this government is doing is making sure that the fact the public and i feel so appalled about what has happened. murder victims, terrorist victims who have had their phones hacked is quite disgraceful and that is why it is important that there is a full police investigation with all the powers that they need. >> warner: labor leader ed miliband pointedly noted that a former "news of the world" editor had been part of cameron's inner circle. andy coulson was forced to resign as downing street communication
of scotland yard-- sir paul stephenson-- also denied wrongdoing. he said he was embarrassed that he'd hired a former "news of the world" executive, neil wallis, as a public relations consultant. wallis has now been arrested. >> i had no reason to connect wallis with phone hacking. i had no reason to doubt his impropriety. nothing had come to my attention. i had no knowledge of the previous inquiry, and i had no reason to enquire of the previous inquiry, and i had been given assurances by a senior grade chief constable that actually there was nothing new. >> brown: away from the hearings, scotland yard announced today it found no outside involvement in the death of sean hoare, a former "news of the world" reporter who'd been an early whistleblower in the scandal. hoare was found dead monday at his home north of london. more now on today's hearings and the murdoch media empire. we're joined, from london, by john burns of "the new york times," and from new york, by david folkenflik, who covers the media for npr. so, john burns, what struck you most about the murdoch's message today? >> well, i
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)